Posts Tagged ‘scientific’

Full Disk Image of Earth Captured August 26, 2011

Full Disk Image of Earth Captured August 26, 2011
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA / NOAA GOES-13 satellite image showing earth on August 26, 2011 at 14:45 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT). Hurricane Irene can been seen on the U.S. East Coast.

Irene Almost 1/3 the Size of East Coast. Irene has become a major hurricane, and NASA satellite data shows its diameter is now about 510 miles — roughly 1/3 the length of the U.S. Atlantic coastline. Hurricane watches are in effect for much of the East Coast.

For up to date information related to Hurricane Irene go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/main/index.html

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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67 Plymouth Satellite HDR
satellite

Image by hz536n/George Thomas
All Mopar event at Milan, MI Dragway July 14, 2012

Tropical Cyclone Funso (08S) over the Mozambique Channel
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image acquired January 23, 2012

On January 23, 2012, Tropical Cyclone Funso raged over the Mozambique Channel, packing sustained winds of 100 knots (185 kilometers per hour) and gusts up to 125 knots (230 kilometers per hour). The U.S. Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that Funso was located roughly 590 nautical miles (1,095 kilometers) northeast of Mozambique’s capital city of Maputo.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on January 23, 2012. The storm spans the channel between Mozambique and Madagascar, and bears a distinct eye. Coastlines and national borders are outlined in black.

The JTWC reported that conditions were favorable for storm intensification. Wind shear (changing wind speed and direction with altitude) tends to hamper storm development, but Funso experienced minimal vertical wind shear on January 23. In addition, sea surface temperatures in the Mozambique Channel were between 28 and 29 degrees Celsius (82 and 84 degrees Fahrenheit)—warm enough to continue fueling the storm. Different models forecast different storm tracks for Funso, including a slowdown, recurvature, and movement toward the south.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA’s Terra Satellite View of Nabro Eruption June 18, 2011

NASA’s Terra Satellite View of Nabro Eruption June 18, 2011
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA’s Terra satellite flew over the Nabro volcano in Eritrea on Saturday, June 18 at 08:00 UTC (4 a.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured this plume of ash and smoke (light-colored) spewing into the air and into Ethiopia (left). Nabro is located in the State of Eritrea, a country in the Horn of Africa. Eritrea’s neighboring countries include Ethiopia to the south, Djibouti to the southeast and Sudan to the west.

The red spot indicates heat from the volcano as registered by the MODIS instrument on Terra. Meanwhile, sand and dust (light brown) not related to the eruption, is blowing over the Gulf of Aden from northern Somalia (right) in the image.

Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response/Text: NASA, Rob Gutro

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA Sees Tropical Storm Darby (05E) off Mexico
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image acquired June 23, 2010.

Tropical Storm Darby (05E) off Mexico

Satellite: Terra

NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation’s largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

NASA’s Terra Satellite Catches Powerful Supertyphoon Megi
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image captured Oct. 18, 2010 at 02:35 UTC

Typhoon Megi (15W) over the Philippines.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite at 10:35 a.m. Philippine Time (02:35 UTC) on October 18, 2010. Megi was bearing down on Palanan Bay as a “super typhoon” with category 5 strength on the Saffir Simpson scale.

Image Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

To learn more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2010/h2010…

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA Satellites Capture Monster Winter Storm

NASA Satellites Capture Monster Winter Storm
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image captured January 31, 2011

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/snowstorm_feb2011.html

Three images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite were combined to create this image of the storm system. The images were captured on January 31 at 10:30 a.m., 12:05 p.m., and 1:45 p.m. Eastern Time (15:30, 17:05, and 18:45 UTC). Diagonal lines across the image show the boundaries between the overpasses. White gaps are areas where the sensor did not collect data. The image has a resolution of one kilometer per pixel.

Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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Iridium 22 Satellite flare 2013.05.13 @ 21h28m03s, Setúbal
satellite

Image by Rui Aperta

Flare Details
Magnitude: -5.6mag
Azimuth: 346.1° NNW altitude: 22.3° in constellation Cassiopeia
Flare angle: 0.19°
Azimuth: 279.6° W
Satellite above: longitude: 13.5°W latitude: +50.3°
Height above Earth: 784.7 km
Distance to satellite: 1634.5 km
Altitude of Sun=-9.3°

Iridium 22 – Satellite Information

Designation:
Spacetrack catalog number: 24907
COSPAR ID: 1997-043-E
Name in Spacetrack catalog: IRIDIUM 22
Satellite Type: Communications

Satellite Details
Orbit 776 x 779 km, 86.4°
Country/organitisation of origin USA
Intrinsic brightness (Mag) 6.2 (at 1000km distance, 50% illuminated)
Maximum brightness (Mag)5.1 (at perigee, 100% illuminated)

Launch
Date (UTC) 21 August 1997 00:38
Launch siteVandenberg AFB,
United States
Launch vehicle Delta 7920-10C

ATS-P Satellite
satellite

Image by San Diego Air & Space Museum Archives
Title: ATS-P Satellite
Catalog #: 08_01291
Additional Information: Application Technology Satellite Spacecraft
Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive

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Part III: West Point Balloon Satellite launch

Part III: West Point Balloon Satellite launch
satellite

Image by West Point – The U.S. Military Academy
This is the final video of the team recovering the payload. With nearly pinpoint accuracy, the Automatic Packet Reporting System guided the team of Astronomy Club and Amateur Radio Club cadets to the location of the satellite. The West Point Balloon Satellite launched at Sam’s Point Preserve near Minnewaska State Park into the stratosphere to record video and still photos of the earth. The payload parachuted in hours later from a height exceeding 85,000 feet to land at a parking lot outside an empty business complex in Newburgh. Video courtesy of the Pointer View/West Point Public Affairs

NASA Satellites See Hurricane Barbara Come Ashore and Fizzle
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA’s TRMM satellite captured this image of Tropical Depression Barbara’s rainfall at 09:58 UTC (2:58 am PDT) on May 30. By this time, Barbara had been downgraded to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds of 30 knots (~35 mph). Most of the rain associated with Barbara at this time appears to be light (blue areas) with a smaller proportion of moderate rain (green areas) than before and only an isolated area of heavy rain along the Gulf coast side (red dot).

Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

—-

NASA Satellites See Hurricane Barbara Come Ashore and Fizzle

Hurricane Barbara recently made landfall along the southern Pacific coast of Mexico and NASA’s TRMM and Suomi NPP satellites captured rainfall rates within the storm, and a night-time image of landfall. NOAA’s GOES satellites provided images that were made into an animation showing the landfall and movement across Mexico into the Bay of Campeche on May 31.

According to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), the center of Hurricane Barbara came ashore around 19:50 UTC (12:50 p.m. PDT) on Wednesday, May 29 about 35 km (~20 miles) west of Tonala, Mexico. At landfall, Barbara was a minimal Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph.

For the full storm history of Hurricane Barbara, visit NASA’s Hurricane page at: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2013/h2013…

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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The How-To Guide to Satellites [hd video]
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
Building satellites isn’t easy. They’re complex, expensive, and not to mention hard to make! This is why whenever NASA makes a new satellite–like the MAVEN mission to Mars–its scientists and engineers do everything they can to make sure it’s done right. One of the most important steps in this process is the design review, where everything is checked and double-checked to make sure the satellite is ready to build!

Click here to watch a video about the MAVEN Mission: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/5054516441/

To read about the MAVEN mission go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/news/confirmation.html

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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Carrington Farm Empty Building

Carrington Farm Empty Building
smoke detector

Image by stewickie
In addition to the double wide trailer we are staying in, our vacant land has six structures on it. The structures range from a potting shed to a one room cabin on top of the hill with a wall full of windows facing a water view. It’s time to take photos for the real estate listing.

This photo is of a structure down near the farm. It’s got an old wood stove in it and is wired for electricity.

The ‘for sale’ sign will show up in the front yard tomorrow. I feel a little sad.

Wildfires in Colorado and New Mexico
smoke detector

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
For the past week, a series of wildfires have been burning in northern New Mexico and central Colorado. This color enhanced image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke and heat signatures on June 11, 2013. The Suomi NPP VIIRS sensor’s highly detailed infrared detectors are able to provide more greater detail about the locations of active fires.

Credit: NASA/NOAA via NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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wind tunnel (1)
smoke detector

Image by mbschn
our smoke alarm is a hypochondriac. whenever the oven is on, it goes off. to make matters worse, the paranoid former owners of the house wired the detector into house power, so you can’t take the batteries out to turn it off.

so here is my new invention. the customary bottom fan was not doing the job, so i tied the top fan to the attic pull string doohicky.

we could test airplane wings in this hallway now.

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Milano design week 2011 :: Salone Satellite

Milano design week 2011 :: Salone Satellite
satellite

Image by br1dotcom
Milano design week 2011 :: Salone Satellite

NASA Satellite Captures Ireland on March 16th
satellite

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA satellite captures Ireland and the United Kingdom on March 16, 2011.

Instrument: Aqua – MODIS

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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Hookahdome 2010 Satellite
satellite

Image by metaphorge
Satellite photo of the Hookahdome/Freakeasy camp at Burning Man 2010: Metropolis. Read more here: www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2010/09/burning_man_2010…

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NASA’s STEREO Sees Filament Break Up

NASA’s STEREO Sees Filament Break Up
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image captured January 4, 2011

To see a video of this event go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/5343507662/

A solar filament became unstable and erupted from the far side of the Sun (Jan. 4, 2011). STEREO, due to its near total views of the Sun from two spacecraft, was the only solar mission able to see it. Filaments are elongated clouds of cooler gases suspended above the Sun by magnetic forces. Many become unstable and erupt.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/STEREO

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA Update (200907210031HQ)
nasa

Image by NASA HQ PHOTO
NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. speaks during his first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA’s 12th Administrator and Lori Garver, the Deputy Administrator, took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

NASA Chief Technologist Hosts Town Hall (201005250003HQ)
nasa

Image by NASA HQ PHOTO
NASA’s Chief Technologists, Bobby Braun, hosts a Town Hall meeting to discuss agency-wide technology policy and programs at NASA Headquarters on Tuesday, May 25, 2010, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Space exhibit, models of early scientific satellites

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Space exhibit, models of early scientific satellites
satellite

Image by Chris Devers
Note that I have IMP-A noted twice. The satellites seem to be related, but while the one on the right margin seems to be a better match for the photo & description, the IMP-A could also be the on the top-middle edge. It could also maybe be the Satellite, IMP-E, Test Unit, but that one looks slight different, and moreover the Smithsonian site (last updated …when?) says that the IMP-E is not currently on public display in the first place.

• Explorer 1 satellite mock-up (Wikipedia)
• Explorer 6 satellite (Wikipedia)
• Explorer 7 satellite (Wikipedia)
• Explorer 8 satellite (Wikipedia)
• Explorer 10 satellite (Wikipedia)
• Explorer 17 satellite (Wikipedia)
• IMP-A satellite (Wikipedia)
• LOFTI-I satellite (Wikipedia)
• Vanguard 3 satellite (Wikipedia)
• Vanguard Lyman Alpha satellite (Wikipedia)
• Vanguard Magnetometer satellite (Wikipedia)

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 6 satellite

Manufacturer:
TRW Space & Technology Group

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 2 ft. 5 in. tall x 2 ft. 2 in. wide, 50 lb. (73.7 x 66cm, 22.7kg)

Materials:
Aluminum alloy; plastic solar cells

This is a full-scale replica of the Explorer 6 satellite. The spacecraft was designed to study the electrical and magnetic fields about the Earth and to test devices for scanning cloud cover. It was launched on August 7, 1959. Over its 60 days of operation it provided the most comprehensive data up to then of the Van Allen radiation belts and the geomagnetic field, as well as the first televised cloud cover pictures. This replica was assembled by the program coordinator, Space Technology Laboratories Inc., from original parts that failed to meet flight specifications. The solar panels are plastic mock-ups. The artifact was displayed at the California Museum of Science and Industry until February 1964, at which time it was donated by STL to the Smithsonian Institution.

Gift of TRW Space Technology Laboratories

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 7 satellite

Manufacturer:
Army Ballistic Missile Agency

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Approximate: 2 ft. 6 in. diameter x 2 ft. 6 in. tall, 92 lb. (76.2 x 76.2cm, 41.7kg)

Materials:
Metal shell, solar cells, electronics

Full-scale replica of the Explorer VII spacecraft. The satellite was launched on October 13, 1959 atop a Juno II vehicle and successfully went into orbit. The spacecraft carried an array of instruments designed to study a broad range of radiation from the sun including X-rays, the intensity of cosmic rays and the field of charged particles in the ionosphere as well as micrometeorite impacts. It provided data from its instruments for 13 months, during the course of which it sent back readings acquired during a major solar flare. The object was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in August 1972 and was restored in 2005.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 8 satellite

Manufacturer:
NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Approximate: 2 ft. 6 in. diameter x 2 ft. 6 in. tall, 86.4 lb. (76.2 x 76.2cm, 39.2kg)

Materials:
Mixed metals, wire, paint.

This is a full-scale replica of an Explorer 8 spacecraft. The satellite was launched on November 3, 1960 atop a Juno II vehicle and successfully went into an elliptical orbit. It carried six specialized instruments designed to study the field of charged particles called the ionosphere as well as micrometeorite impacts. Explorer 8 continued to provide data until December 27, 1960. This is one of two specimens in the collection and was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in August 1972 by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 1 satellite mock-up

Manufacturer:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 6 in. wide x 5 ft. 8 1/2 in. long, 28 lb. (15.2 x 174cm)

Materials:
Metal shell

This is one of several full-scale replicas of Explorer 1 in the NASM collection. It consists of the payload section attached to an empty Sergeant fourth-stage, solid-fuel rocket motor. It was transferred to NASM by the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum in 1988. Explorer 1, also known unofficially as Satellite 1958 alpha, was the first American satellite to successfully orbit the Earth. Data from this and two subsequent Explorer satellites led to the discovery by James Van Allen of a belt of intense radiation surrounding the Earth.

Transferred from the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | IMP-A satellite

Manufacturer:
NASA – Goddard Space Flight Center

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 4 ft. 5 in. tall x 2 ft. 5 in. wide x 1 ft. 1 in. diameter, 75 lb. (134.62 x 73.66 x 33.02cm, 34kg)

Materials:
Mixed metals, solar cells, electronics

This is the engineering model for the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform A (IMP-A or Explorer 18). It is the first of a series of seven satellites designed to be launched before and during Apollo flights. IMP-A carried instruments designed to measure cosmic rays, the solar wind, and interplanetary magnetic fields beyond the earth’s magnetic field. The sphere on top of the boom contained a sensitive magnetometer. Four windmill-like solar panels provided operating power. The satellite was launched on November 26, 1963 aboard a Delta vehicle resulting in a highly elliptical orbit that ranged from 110 to 122,800 miles. Data from the mission led to the discovery of a new layer of radiation beyond the Van Allen belt and confirmed the existence of a standing shock wave in the solar wind around the earth’s magnetic field. This object was transferred to NASM by NASA in May 1976.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 17 satellite

Manufacturer:
NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 2 ft. 11 in. wide, 80 lb. (88.9cm, 36.3kg)

Materials:
Stainless steel

This is a refurbished full-scale replica of the Explorer 17 aeronomy satellite. Explorer 17 was one of the first launched by NASA to study the Earth’s upper atmosphere. The pressurized stainless steel sphere carried instruments to measure density, pressure, and temperature. It also contained a neutral mass spectrometer to study the composition of the gases in the upper atmosphere. The satellite was placed in a 158- to 570-mile orbit on April 3, 1963 by a Thor Delta launch vehicle. Data from the mass spectrometer showed the presence of molecular oxygen, atomic and molecular nitrogen and argon in the upper atmosphere; it also led to the discovery of a belt of neutral helium about the Earth. Constructed of original parts, it was refurbished by technicians at the Goddard Space Flight Center prior to its transfer to NASM from NASA in March 1975.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | IMP-A satellite

Manufacturer:
NASA – Goddard Space Flight Center

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 4 ft. 5 in. tall x 2 ft. 5 in. wide x 1 ft. 1 in. diameter, 75 lb. (134.62 x 73.66 x 33.02cm, 34kg)

Materials:
Mixed metals, solar cells, electronics

This is the engineering model for the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform A (IMP-A or Explorer 18). It is the first of a series of seven satellites designed to be launched before and during Apollo flights. IMP-A carried instruments designed to measure cosmic rays, the solar wind, and interplanetary magnetic fields beyond the earth’s magnetic field. The sphere on top of the boom contained a sensitive magnetometer. Four windmill-like solar panels provided operating power. The satellite was launched on November 26, 1963 aboard a Delta vehicle resulting in a highly elliptical orbit that ranged from 110 to 122,800 miles. Data from the mission led to the discovery of a new layer of radiation beyond the Van Allen belt and confirmed the existence of a standing shock wave in the solar wind around the earth’s magnetic field. This object was transferred to NASM by NASA in May 1976.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Explorer 10 satellite

Manufacturer:
NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 1 ft. 8 in. wide x 4 ft. 7 in. deep, 48 lb. (50.8 x 139.7cm, 21.8kg)

Materials:
Aluminum, magnesium, lead, fiberglass and plastic

This is a full-scale reconstructed model of the Explorer 10 satellite. Explorer 10 was designed to map the interplanetary magnetic field using three different magnetometers, as well as a plasma probe. The most sensitive of those was mounted in a very prominent sphere mounted atop a fiberglass support boom. The magnetometers were produced by Goddard Space Flight Center, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology provided the plasma probe. It launched in March 1961 aboard a Thor-Delta with the intention of inserting it into a highly elliptical orbit to reach the region of space between the Earth and Moon. The data stream lasted only for 52 hours when the craft was estimated to be over 40 earth-radii distant, 2/3rds the distance to the lunar orbit. Explorer 10 made the first measurements of magnetic fields and solar plasmas outside the Earth’s magnetosphere. The data gathered gave support to the theory that the magnetic field surrounding the Earth is closely tied to that of the Sun.

The replica was refurbished by technicians at the Goddard Space Flight Center prior to its transfer to NASM from NASA in March 1975. All the major internal scientific instruments are represented, but many of the internal elements are dummies.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | LOFTI-I satellite

Manufacturer:
Naval Research Laboratory

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 1 ft. 8 in. wide, 18 lb. (50.8cm, 8.2kg)
Other (antennae): 3 ft. long (91.44cm)

Materials:
Polished aluminum sphere, solar arrays

Engineering model for the first of a series of LOw Frequency Trans-Ionospheric (LOFTI) radio satellites. LOFTI satellites were one of the very early orbiting spacecraft intended to study the propagation of radio waves through and by the ionosphere. The experiment was also designed to determine whether low frequency radio signals penetrated water reliably enough to be used for communications with submerged submarines. The first in the series, LOFTI-1 was launched on a Thor-Able rocket in 1961; the scheduled separation from the Transit-3B satellite to which it was attached failed. Much valuable data on VLF and VHF transionospheric transmission was obtained in spite of the satellite’s resulting shortened time in orbit. This artifact was transferred to NASM from the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory in 1975.

Transferred from the Naval Research Laboratory

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vanguard Lyman Alpha satellite

Manufacturer:
Naval Research Laboratory

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 1 ft. 8 in. wide, 10 lb. (50.8cm, 4.5kg)
Other (antennae): 2 ft. 6 in. long (76.2cm)

Materials:
Aluminum

This is an instrumented full-scale replica of the Vanguard Lyman Alpha satellite, also called SLV-1. It was designed to provide data on solar radiation in the 1100-1300 Angstrom region, known as the Lyman alpha band. The satellite was launched on May 27, 1958 but failed to go into orbit due to malfunction of the launch rocket. The replica was manufactured at the Naval Research Laboratory and may have been a flight spare. It was refurbished by technicians at the Goddard Space Flight Center prior to its transfer to NASM from NASA in March 1975. It was on display at the Science Museum in London, England until 1988.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vanguard 3 satellite

Manufacturer:
Naval Research Laboratory

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 2 ft. 6 in. tall x 1 ft. 1 in. wide, 25 lb. (76.2 x 33.02cm, 11.3kg)
Other (antennae): 2 ft. long (60.96cm)

Materials:
Metallic shell, phenolic mast

This is a full-scale replica of the Vanguard Magnetometer satellite, designated SLV-5 or Vanguard 3a. It was designed to study the Earth’s magnetic field. The magnetometer sensor was at the end of the cylindrical boom to avoid interference from the other instruments. The satellite was launched on April 13, 1959 but failed to go into orbit due to loss of control during first stage separation. This replica was manufactured at the Naval Research Laboratory from original components. It was refurbished at the Goddard Space Flight Center prior to its transfer to NASM from NASA in March 1975. It was displayed in the Satellites Gallery (1976-1984).

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • • • •

Quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vanguard Magnetometer satellite

Manufacturer:
Naval Research Laboratory

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 3 ft. 10 in. tall x 1 ft. 8 in. diameter x 6 ft. 6 in. overall, 24.2 lb. (116.84 x 50.8 x 198.12cm, 11kg)

Materials:
Metal, plastic

This is a full-scale replica of the Vanguard 3 satellite. Vanguard 3 was designed to measure solar X-rays, the Earth’s magnetic field, and micrometeoroids. It was placed in orbit in December 1959 atop a Vanguard launch vehicle. The intensity of radiation in the Van Allen belts swamped the ionization chambers, so no useful data was obtained, but the magnetic field studies with the proton-precession magnetometer were successful. Vanguard 3, also called Magne-Ray Satellite was the third and final successful satellite in Project Vanguard. The 100-pound spacecraft operated 84 days, providing excellent magnetometer data for the scientist-investigators at the newly-estabished NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. The Vanguard Program, with its embarrassing early failures, ultimately provided a great deal of new information about the space environment. The launch failure rate was actually typical for that era in space exploration.

This replica was manufactured at the Naval Research Laboratory. It was refurbished by technicians at the Goddard Space Flight Center prior to its transfer to NASM from NASA in March 1975. It was on loan to the McKinley Museum of History in Canton, Ohio (1978-1999).

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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