Posts Tagged ‘NASA’s’

Sunday Experiment Highlights NASA’s MMS Mission: Join us from 1-3 PM on Sunday, March 16 at Goddard’s Visitors Center : NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission via brief presentations from MMS scientists, hands-on activities that include spacecraft

A few nice Lego NASA images I found:

Sunday Experiment Highlights NASA’s MMS Mission: Join us from 1-3 PM on Sunday, March 16 at Goddard’s Visitors Center : NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission via brief presentations from MMS scientists, hands-on activities that include spacecraft
Lego NASA

Image by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Sunday Experiment Highlights NASA’s MMS Mission: Join us from 1-3 PM on Sunday, March 16 at Goddard’s Visitors Center : NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission via brief presentations from MMS scientists, hands-on activities that include spacecraft modeling (LEGO, paper), NASA Apps and iPad Teacher Tools, magnetism, mission career videos and more!

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Bill Hrybyk

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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CPK Sentinels & The CPKF Insignia
Lego NASA

Image by Joriel “Joz” Jimenez
The Commonwealth Peace Keeper Sentinels provide real-time minifig intel and intervention for the Commonwealth Peace Keeping Forces. Often working alone or in small fire teams the Sentinels are a crucial part to the operations out of Cambay, although specific campaign contributions are little known.

The Peace Keepers are featured here with Will Chapman’s BrickArms accessories: PSG1 Sniper Rifle, M23 SOCOM Pistol, G36 Assault Rifle, M47 Tactical Shotgun and the M41A ‘Xeno’ Pulse Rifle.

Previously posted and reviewed at MOCpages.

About the Logo
Every organisation has a trademark. I wanted to give my Commonwealth Peace Keepers a flag that was unique and distinguishable as my own. It incorporates the Olive Branches of Peace, the Flying Kangaroo, the Southern Cross, Federation Star, a starfield and a variation of the Lego SPACE logo.

The CPK Insiginia was composed bit by bit pixel by pixel in Adobe Elements using the following sources as guides:

– Royal Australian Air Force ingsinia for the ‘roo
– Flag of the United Nations for the branches
– Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia for the Southern Cross & Federation Star
– Lego Space logo for the flying spaceship*
– NASA insignia for the additional stars.

*The spaceship itself was replaced by the profile of the Mutdang Aerospace single seat fighter, designed and built by Boris and I in the late 1990’s. I recreated the Mutdang using MLCAD and using the image data I incorporated it into the CPK insignia.

MER 20120529 04
Lego NASA

Image by Apojove

NASA at Miniland
Lego NASA

Image by Scorpions and Centaurs
Legoland ~~ Windsor, England

Maia + Ellen
Lego NASA

Image by pixbymaia
With Johnson Space Center director Ellen Ochoa and her LEGO Scitweep

World Science Festival James Webb Space Telescope LEGO set
Lego NASA

Image by James Webb Space Telescope
Children playing with the Webb telescope LEGO set at the World Science Festival

The sets aren’t cheap, but they can be obtained here: www.jwstinlego.com/

Credit: Northrop Grumman

(Note: All images with children have appropriate photo releases.)

NASA Image Use Policy

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NASA’s modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Space Shuttle Atlantis

NASA’s modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Space Shuttle Atlantis
nasa

Image by NASA on The Commons
Collection: NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Collection

Photo Description: NASA’s modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Space Shuttle Atlantis on top lifts off from Edwards Air Force Base to begin its ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The cross-country journey will take approximately two days, with stops at several intermediate points for refueling.

Project Description: Space Shuttle Atlantis descended to a smooth landing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., concluding a successful assembly mission to the International Space Station. With Commander Rick Sturckow and Pilot Lee Archambault at the controls, Atlantis landed at 12:49 p.m. PDT on June 22, 2007. Atlantis launched June 8, 2007, and arrived at the International Space Station on June 10. While at the orbital outpost, the crew installed the Starboard 3 and 4 truss segment and conducted four spacewalks to activate it. During the third spacewalk, the crew repaired an out of position thermal blanket on the left orbital maneuvering system pod. Atlantis also delivered a new station crew member, Flight Engineer Clayton Anderson. He replaced astronaut Suni Williams, who is the new record holder for a long-duration single spaceflight for a woman. She arrived at the station in December of 2006 with STS-116. STS-117 is the 118th shuttle mission and 21st mission to visit the space station.

Photo Date: July 1, 2007
NASA Photo by: Carla Thomas

Photo Number: ED07-0137-32
UID: SPD-DRYDEN-ED07-0137 -32
Original url: www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/STS-117/HTML/ED07-0137-32…

SOURCE: nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~8~8~62547~166395

Visit www.nasaimages.org for the most comprehensive compilation of NASA stills, film and video, created in partnership with Internet Archive.

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NASA’s 2009 Great Moonbuggy Race (April 5, 2009)

NASA’s 2009 Great Moonbuggy Race (April 5, 2009)
nasa

Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
NASA’s 2009 Great Moonbuggy Race has run its course. Check out the joy and determination in these expressions — truly the "face of the race."

Check out all the details on the 2009 Great Moonbuggy Race, including winning buggy designs, at:
www.nasa.gov/topics/moonmars/moonbuggy.html

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NASA’s Hubble Zooms in on a Space Oddity

NASA’s Hubble Zooms in on a Space Oddity
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image release January 10, 2011

In this image by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an unusual, ghostly green blob of gas appears to float near a normal-looking spiral galaxy.

The bizarre object, dubbed Hanny’s Voorwerp (Hanny’s Object in Dutch), is the only visible part of a 300,000-light-year-long streamer of gas stretching around the galaxy, called IC 2497. The greenish Voorwerp is visible because a searchlight beam of light from the galaxy’s core illuminated it. This beam came from a quasar, a bright, energetic object that is powered by a black hole. The quasar may have turned off about 200,000 years ago.

This Hubble view uncovers a pocket of star clusters, the yellowish-orange area at the tip of Hanny’s Voorwerp. The star clusters are confined to an area that is a few thousand light-years wide. The youngest stars are a couple of million years old. The Voorwerp is the size of our Milky Way galaxy, and its bright green color is from glowing oxygen.

Hubble also shows that gas flowing from IC 2497 may have instigated the star birth by compressing the gas in Hanny’s Voorwerp. The galaxy is located about 650 million light-years from Earth.

What appears to be a gaping hole in Hanny’s Voorwerp actually may be a shadow cast by an object in the quasar’s light path. The feature gives the illusion of a hole about 20,000 light-years wide. Hubble reveals sharp edges but no other changes in the gas around the apparent opening, suggesting that an object close to the quasar may have blocked some of the light and projected a shadow on the Voorwerp. This phenomenon is similar to a fly on a movie projector lens casting a shadow on a movie screen.

An interaction between IC 2497 and another galaxy about a billion years ago may have created Hanny’s Voorwerp and fueled the quasar. The Hubble image shows that IC 2497 has been disturbed, with complex dust patches, warped spiral arms, and regions of star formation around its core. These features suggest the aftermath of a galaxy merger. The bright spots in the central part of the galaxy are star-forming regions. The small, pinkish object to the lower right of IC 2497 is an edge-on spiral galaxy in the background.

The image was made by combining data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The ACS exposures were taken April 12, 2010; the WFC3 data, April 4, 2010.

Object Names: Hanny’s Voorwerp, IC 2497

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, W. Keel (University of Alabama), and the Galaxy Zoo Team

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA’s Magnetospheric Mission Passes Major Milestone

NASA’s Magnetospheric Mission Passes Major Milestone
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Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image release September 3, 2010

(Caption: Artist conception of the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft investigating magnetic reconnection within Earth’s magnetic field (magnetosphere). Credit: Southwest Research Institute)

The universe is still an arcane place that scientists know very little about, but a new NASA Solar Terrestrial Probe mission is going to shed light on one especially mysterious event called magnetic reconnection. It occurs when magnetic lines of force cross, cancel, and reconnect releasing magnetic energy in the form of heat and charged-particle kinetic energy.

On the sun, magnetic reconnection causes solar flares more powerful than several atomic bombs combined. In Earth’s atmosphere, magnetic reconnection dispenses magnetic storms and auroras, and in laboratories on Earth it can cause big problems in fusion reactors.

Although the study of magnetic reconnection dates back to the 1950s and despite numerous scientific papers addressing this perplexing issue, scientists still cannot agree on one accepted model.

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/sunearthsystem/main/mms-c…

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation’s largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

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NASA’s Crawler Transporter Prepared for Future Missions

NASA's Crawler Transporter Prepared for Future Missions

AmericaSpace’s Alan Walters and Jason Rhian toured one of NASA’s massive crawlet transporters learning what changes were being made to these iconic vehicles.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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NASA’s GPM Satellite Tested on Goddard’s Centrifuge

NASA’s GPM Satellite Tested on Goddard’s Centrifuge
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
April 1, 2011

NASA technicians spun the Global Precipitation Monitor (GPM) satellite up to just over 10 RPM in Goddard Space Flight Center’s High-Capacity Centrifuge facility March 31. At that speed, the spin exerted a lateral pressure of 2.4 G’s, or 2.4 times the force of gravity on the satellite.

Spin tests such as these are used to determine whether the forces of launch could adversely affect hardware we put into space, and to test spacecraft chassis design.

In this case, a combination of flight hardware parts and the so-called mass model were spun. The mass model simulates the final size, shape and weight distribution of the satellite and it’s component sensors, fuel, maneuvering thrusters, processing and control equipment.

GPM will study global rain, snow and ice to better understand our climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. For more on the GPM mission, visit gpm.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Goddard’s 120-foot-diameter centrifuge can accelerate a 2.5-ton payload up to 30 Gs, well beyond the force experienced in a launch. The most intense roller-coasters in the world top out at about 5 Gs, and then only for brief moments. The 2.4 Gs experienced by GPM would be sufficient to prevent blood from flowing up into a person’s brain, inducing blackout if sustained.

Karl B. Hille

Photo Credit: NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth

To learn more about GPM go to: gpm.gsfc.nasa.gov/

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA’s Global Hawk in the Eye of Hurricane Earl on September 2, 2010

NASA’s Global Hawk in the Eye of Hurricane Earl on September 2, 2010
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA’s Global Hawk in the Eye of Hurricane Earl on September 2 This photo of Hurricane Earl’s eye was taken from the HDVis camera on the underside of the Global Hawk aircraft during the morning of Thursday, Sept. 2 at 13:05 UTC (9:05 a.m. EDT). The Global Hawk captured this photo from an altitude of 60,000 ft. (about 11.4 miles high). The Global Hawk is one of three aircraft involved in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment. GRIP is a NASA Earth science field experiment that runs from August 15-September 30, 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes.

Credit: NASA/NOAA

To learn more about Hurricane Earl go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2010/h2010…

To learn more about Global Hawk and the GRIP Hurricane Mission go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/missions/grip/main/…

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation’s largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

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NASA’s Hubble Universe in 3-D

NASA’s Hubble Universe in 3-D
nasa

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
This image depicts a vast canyon of dust and gas in the Orion Nebula from a 3-D computer model based on observations by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and created by science visualization specialists at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md. A 3-D visualization of this model takes viewers on an amazing four-minute voyage through the 15-light-year-wide canyon.

Credit: NASA, G. Bacon, L. Frattare, Z. Levay, and F. Summers (STScI/AURA)

Go here to learn more about Hubble 3D:

www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/hubble_imax_premier…

or

www.imax.com/hubble/

Take an exhilarating ride through the Orion Nebula, a vast star-making factory 1,500 light-years away. Swoop through Orion’s giant canyon of gas and dust. Fly past behemoth stars whose brilliant light illuminates and energizes the entire cloudy region. Zoom by dusty tadpole-shaped objects that are fledgling solar systems.

This virtual space journey isn’t the latest video game but one of several groundbreaking astronomy visualizations created by specialists at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, the science operations center for NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The cinematic space odysseys are part of the new Imax film "Hubble 3D," which opens today at select Imax theaters worldwide.

The 43-minute movie chronicles the 20-year life of Hubble and includes highlights from the May 2009 servicing mission to the Earth-orbiting observatory, with footage taken by the astronauts.

The giant-screen film showcases some of Hubble’s breathtaking iconic pictures, such as the Eagle Nebula’s "Pillars of Creation," as well as stunning views taken by the newly installed Wide Field Camera 3.

While Hubble pictures of celestial objects are awe-inspiring, they are flat 2-D photographs. For this film, those 2-D images have been converted into 3-D environments, giving the audience the impression they are space travelers taking a tour of Hubble’s most popular targets.

"A large-format movie is a truly immersive experience," says Frank Summers, an STScI astronomer and science visualization specialist who led the team that developed the movie visualizations. The team labored for nine months, working on four visualization sequences that comprise about 12 minutes of the movie.

"Seeing these Hubble images in 3-D, you feel like you are flying through space and not just looking at picture postcards," Summers continued. "The spacescapes are all based on Hubble images and data, though some artistic license is necessary to produce the full depth of field needed for 3-D."

The most ambitious sequence is a four-minute voyage through the Orion Nebula’s gas-and-dust canyon, about 15 light-years across. During the ride, viewers will see bright and dark, gaseous clouds; thousands of stars, including a grouping of bright, hefty stars called the Trapezium; and embryonic planetary systems. The tour ends with a detailed look at a young circumstellar disk, which is much like the structure from which our solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago.

Based on a Hubble image of Orion released in 2006, the visualization was a collaborative effort between science visualization specialists at STScI, including Greg Bacon, who sculpted the Orion Nebula digital model, with input from STScI astronomer Massimo Roberto; the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

For some of the sequences, STScI imaging specialists developed new techniques for transforming the 2-D Hubble images into 3-D. STScI image processing specialists Lisa Frattare and Zolt Levay, for example, created methods of splitting a giant gaseous pillar in the Carina Nebula into multiple layers to produce a 3-D effect, giving the structure depth. The Carina Nebula is a nursery for baby stars.

Frattare painstakingly removed the thousands of stars in the image so that Levay could separate the gaseous layers on the isolated Carina pillar. Frattare then replaced the stars into both foreground and background layers to complete the 3-D model. For added effect, the same separation was done for both visible and infrared Hubble images, allowing the film to cross-fade between wavelength views in 3-D.

In another sequence viewers fly into a field of 170,000 stars in the giant star cluster Omega Centauri. STScI astronomer Jay Anderson used his stellar database to create a synthetic star field in 3-D that matches recent razor-sharp Hubble photos.

The film’s final four-minute sequence takes viewers on a voyage from our Milky Way Galaxy past many of Hubble’s best galaxy shots and deep into space. Some 15,000 galaxies from Hubble’s deepest surveys stretch billions of light-years across the universe in a 3-D sequence created by STScI astronomers and visualizers. The view dissolves into a cobweb that traces the universe’s large-scale structure, the backbone from which galaxies were born.

In addition to creating visualizations, STScI’s education group also provided guidance on the "Hubble 3D" Educator Guide, which includes standards-based lesson plans and activities about Hubble and its mission. Students will use the guide before or after seeing the movie.

"The guide will enhance the movie experience for students and extend the movie into classrooms," says Bonnie Eisenhamer, STScI’s Hubble Formal Education manager.

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) and is managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) conducts Hubble science operations. The institute is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., Washington, D.C.

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NASA’s Alien Anomalies caught on film – A compilation of stunning UFO footage from NASA’s archives

This compilation includes many of my favorite NASA UFO encounters/sightings that I have archived over the years. All of these examples (with the exception of the second-to-last one) were captured on film by NASA astronauts or Russian Cosmonauts over the past half-century – showing many amazing examples from different eras – Gemini, Apollo, Apollo/Soyuz Test Project, Skylab, STS, the ISS, plus a couple Russian-source additions from their unmanned Zond and Mir Space Station programs as well thrown in to round things out. The second last example is the only one in the compilation that features footage that was not taken in space and is not official-source (NASA or Soviet/Russian Space Agency). That clip shows an LTP (Lunar Transient Phenomenon) event captured through a camera connected to the eyepiece of a terrestrial-based telescope that luckily was being focused on the Moon at the time. In this case, the LTP manifests as an object transiting across the face of the lunar disc. Many thanks to amateur astronomer Alberto Mayer of Italy for doing a wonderful job of filming this stunning event (and for stacking the footage for us all to see). While the examples you will see here captured on film can all be “officially” classified as “unidentified” objects, that absolutely does NOT mean that NASA, the DoD, and certain elements within the scientific community worldwide are completely in the dark as to what these things you are seeing are. Make no mistake: The Powers That Be are
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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