Posts Tagged ‘missions’

A glovebox cell inside Building 235-F

A glovebox cell inside Building 235-F
Radioactive materials

Image by Savannah River Site
Building 235-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was part of the original construction in the early 1950s. It has had several production missions throughout its operational life, each of which has left a stamp on the robust facility. Its operations have benefited our nation’s defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE).

The facility is a blast-resistant, windowless, two-story, reinforced concrete structure about 222 feet long, 109 feet wide, and 28 feet high. It is located in SRS’s F Area, near F Canyon and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, which is under construction.

This production facility’s most recent mission was receipt, storage and disbursement of plutonium-bearing materials in support of SRS and the DOE complex. However, in 2006, the storage vaults for nuclear materials were emptied, and the facility is currently being maintained in a surveillance and maintenance mode awaiting deactivation.

Steps taken to date to reduce the remaining hazards within Building 235-F include stack reduction and removal of transient combustibles. The stack was reduced in height to prevent potential damage to the roof of the facility in the unlikely event it should fall. Most recently a project team has been formed to plan and execute the final disposition for the facility. Activities planned include restoration of services to the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) gloveboxes, decontamination of the gloveboxes, and characterization of the remaining radioactive material in preparation for the final facility disposition.

PuFF, one of the processes that once was operated within 235-F, was originally designed and operated to manufacture plutonium pellets for the NASA space program from the late 1970s to the early 1980s. In December 1983, DOE completed Pu-238 sphere and pellet production for NASA’s Galileo and Ulysses space missions at PuFF. Other process lines within Building 235-F include the Actinide Billet Line, Plutonium Experimental Facility, and the old metallography lab.

Early in the U.S. space program, scientists recognized that converting thermal energy into electricity using the heat associated with radioactive materials was the best source of energy. Coupling radioactive heat with a thermoelectric converter became the power source of choice for satellites.

Long term, deep-space missions, such as Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini, use SRS Pu-238 to generate long-term electrical power needed to operate the instruments on board the spacecraft, to include operating cameras, collecting data, and relaying information to the earth. source of energy. Coupling radioactive heat with a thermoelectric converter became the power source of choice for satellites.

Aerial of Building 235-F at SRS
Radioactive materials

Image by Savannah River Site
Building 235-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was part of the original construction in the early 1950s. It has had several production missions throughout its operational life, each of which has left a stamp on the robust facility. Its operations have benefited our nation’s defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE).

The facility is a blast-resistant, windowless, two-story, reinforced concrete structure about 222 feet long, 109 feet wide, and 28 feet high. It is located in SRS’s F Area, near F Canyon and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, which is under construction.

This production facility’s most recent mission was receipt, storage and disbursement of plutonium-bearing materials in support of SRS and the DOE complex. However, in 2006, the storage vaults for nuclear materials were emptied, and the facility is currently being maintained in a surveillance and maintenance mode awaiting deactivation.

Steps taken to date to reduce the remaining hazards within Building 235-F include stack reduction and removal of transient combustibles. The stack was reduced in height to prevent potential damage to the roof of the facility in the unlikely event it should fall. Most recently a project team has been formed to plan and execute the final disposition for the facility. Activities planned include restoration of services to the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) gloveboxes, decontamination of the gloveboxes, and characterization of the remaining radioactive material in preparation for the final facility disposition.

PuFF, one of the processes that once was operated within 235-F, was originally designed and operated to manufacture plutonium pellets for the NASA space program from the late 1970s to the early 1980s. In December 1983, DOE completed Pu-238 sphere and pellet production for NASA’s Galileo and Ulysses space missions at PuFF. Other process lines within Building 235-F include the Actinide Billet Line, Plutonium Experimental Facility, and the old metallography lab.

Early in the U.S. space program, scientists recognized that converting thermal energy into electricity using the heat associated with radioactive materials was the best source of energy. Coupling radioactive heat with a thermoelectric converter became the power source of choice for satellites.

Long term, deep-space missions, such as Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini, use SRS Pu-238 to generate long-term electrical power needed to operate the instruments on board the spacecraft, to include operating cameras, collecting data, and relaying information to the earth. source of energy. Coupling radioactive heat with a thermoelectric converter became the power source of choice for satellites.

The TEPCO’s Incident
Radioactive materials

Image by Demipoulpe
1930: Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano announces that Prime Minister Naoto Kan has declared a "nuclear emergency status". Officials reassure people that this is standard procedure in events like this and no radioactive material has been detected in the area surrounding the power station.

Talent : Mélainya Comtesse-Bathory
Photography: Me AKA DemiPoulpe

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Space Shuttle STS-128 Mission (NASA, 09/03/09)

Space Shuttle STS-128 Mission (NASA, 09/03/09)
Space Shuttle

Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
NASA astronaut John "Danny" Olivas, STS-128 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 39-minute spacewalk, Olivas and European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the new Ammonia Tank Assembly on the Port 1 Truss and stowed the empty tank assembly into the Space Shuttle Discovery’s cargo bay.

Credit: NASA

Follow the "Sailing With NASA" blog and the ET-134 journey:
blogs.nasa.gov/cm/blog/sailing_with_nasa

Space Shuttle Endeavour Move (201210120014HQ)
Space Shuttle

Image by nasa hq photo
Wide-angle aerial view from the Goodyear blimp shows the California route 405 freeway in the Los Angeles area with the space shuttle Endeavour next to the Randy’s Donuts landmark in Inglewood, Calif., Friday, Oct. 12, 2012. Endeavour, built as a replacement for space shuttle Challenger, completed 25 missions, spent 299 days in orbit, and orbited Earth 4,671 times while traveling 122,883,151 miles. Beginning Oct. 30, the shuttle will be on display in the CSC’s Samuel Oschin Space Shuttle Endeavour Display Pavilion, embarking on its new mission to commemorate past achievements in space and educate and inspire future generations of explorers. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Space Shuttle Atlantis Move (201211020020HQ)
Space Shuttle

Image by nasa hq photo
Karol Bobko, who commanded STS-51, the first flight of space shuttle Atlantis, background, speaks at the signing ceremony, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The spacecraft traveled 125,935,769 miles during 33 spaceflights, including 12 missions to the International Space Station. Its final flight, STS-135, closed out the Space Shuttle Program era with a landing on July 21, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

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NASA’s Crawler Transporter Prepared for Future Missions

NASA's Crawler Transporter Prepared for Future Missions

AmericaSpace’s Alan Walters and Jason Rhian toured one of NASA’s massive crawlet transporters learning what changes were being made to these iconic vehicles.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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Space Shuttle: The complete missions — by Nature Video

NASA’s 30-year Space Transportation System (STS) program came to an end on 21st July 2011. The Space Shuttle fleet delivered the Hubble Space Telescope, the International Space Station, and dozens of satellites, space probes, crew and supplies. Two Shuttles were lost: Challenger in 1986 and Columbia in 2003. The touchdown of Atlantis at Kennedy Space Center marked the end of an era, after 135 missions. This video shows all of them in chronological order. www.nature.com Soundtrack: ‘PX3′ and ‘Retreat! Retreat!’ by 65daysofstatic.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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