Posts Tagged ‘Inside’

Looking for Davey Jones’ Locker Key

Looking for Davey Jones’ Locker Key
smoke detector

Image by Peter E. Lee
A lone treasure hunter searches the sands at Dane Street Beach in Beverly, MA, looking for buried metal.

This was taken on the same misty day as the recent "social climbers" picture. The smoke stacks visible across the bay are part of the Salem Harbor Power plant in Salem, MA.

Best viewed large on black (try Flickr’s Lightbox mode).

Inside a Stormtrooper helmet
smoke detector

Image by tevensso
This particular model is equipped with extra special optical gear which gives three-dimensional images of the surroundings, protects the eyes against too strong light and gives you vision in smoke, darkness or fire. The helmets’ optical gear varies from this to simple lenses.

Fake naturally, but very cool nevertheless. From the book "Star Wars – The visual dictionary."

Carbon Monoxide leaks can be deadly
smoke detector

Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
Learn More About U.S. Army in Korea

Carbon Monoxide leaks can be deadly

Story and photo by Andrew M, Allen
andrew.m.allen14.civ@mail.mil

DAEGU GARRISON — “911, what is your emergency?”
Caller: “I don’t know……I have a headache, I’m dizzy and I feel real sick……my husband won’t wake up…..”

911 Operator: “Get everyone outside, we are responding emergency crews to your home, you may have CO poisoning.”

This is the call that far too often is received by emergency services around the world. U.S. Army Garrison Daegu is ready to respond 24/7, however, just like fire prevention, carbon monoxide prevention is the best defense to stop this from ever happening to you and your family.

Know thy enemy. CO, or carbon monoxide, sneaks into homes every year via faulty heaters, fire places, or even an idling vehicle outside. CO can also sneak into your car while you are driving.

Either a faulty exhaust system or directly out of the tail pipe are ways CO can sneak into your vehicle. Thousands are sickened every year from CO; many suffer serious injuries or death, will you be another statistic?

What should you do if your CO detector activates? First, do not panic. Second, check everyone in the home including pets. Next, open all the windows – call 9-1-1 or from a cell phone 0505-764-5911. Then wait outside (or at a neighbor’s); when the firefighters arrive, tell them what the situation is and they will go in and take a CO reading. If you have any symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning, tell the 911 dispatcher and the firefighters when they arrive.

Knowing the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning can help you identify the problem before it is too late. Here are some common symptoms related to CO poisoning; you should discuss these with the whole family.

Mild Exposure: slight headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue (often described as “flu-like” symptoms).

Medium Exposure: severe throbbing headache, drowsiness, confusion, fast heart rate.

Extreme Exposure: unconsciousness, convulsions, cardio-respiratory failure, death.

Your overall health and size will affect how quickly CO attacks you. If you are a smoker, CO will hit you faster and harder as you already have a buildup of CO in your system.

Think it can’t happen to you or your family? When CO sneaks in, you will never know. Consequently you need some way of sounding an alarm when the silent killer comes sneaking into your home.

A CO detector that is properly maintained and tested monthly will stand watch while you sleep. This is very important, be sure you can hear your CO detector in your bedroom.

According to NFPA 720, all CO detectors “shall be centrally located outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.”

Additionally each detector shall be located on the wall, ceiling or other location as specified in the instructions that comes with the unit.

Smoke alarms and CO detectors are two different items; however, they are both there to save your life if prevention fails.

Take care of them, test them and ensure everyone knows what to do if they go off!

1 Comment »

Spacewalking Over Earth (NASA, Space Shuttle, 05/17/10)

Spacewalking Over Earth (NASA, Space Shuttle, 05/17/10)
Space Shuttle

Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Editor’s Note: This was just too good not to share. This is REALLY working "outdoors." Special thanks to the folks at Johnson Space Center for this gorgeous image. Please visit their link below.

NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 25-minute spacewalk, Reisman and NASA astronaut Steve Bowen (out of frame), mission specialist, loosened bolts holding six replacement batteries, installed a second antenna for high-speed Ku-band transmissions and adding a spare parts platform to Dextre, a two-armed extension for the station’s robotic arm.

Image/caption credit: NASA

View original image/caption:
spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-23/html/…

More about space station science:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/index.html

There’s a Flickr group about Space Station Science. Please feel welcome to join! www.flickr.com/groups/stationscience/

ISS and Shuttle Endeavour
Space Shuttle

Image by quantestorie
ISS and Shuttle Endeavour – STS127 passing by…

Inside the Cockpit of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft 747 (NASA, Space Shuttle, 6/2/09)
Space Shuttle

Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
From the Shuttle Ferry Blog:

"All together we’ve got four NASA pilots flying the SCA 747 this time; Charlie Justiz, Frank Marlow, Jack Nickel and SCA Chief Pilot, Jeff Moultrie. These guys are former military aviators and are based out of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. (We also have one more SCA pilot, Bill Brocket, who’s based out of Dryden. He wasn’t able to make this trip.) Together, these four have logged a whole lot of hours of flight time in everything from shuttle training planes to T-38 jets to the Super Guppy. They definitely know what they’re doing.

I found out that the number of SCA refueling stops, like this one at Lackland, depends on the weight of the orbiter on top and the weather along the way, but the carrier must stop to refuel at least once on its trip to Kennedy. During a normal flight, the 747 can use 20,000 pounds of fuel an hour. With Atlantis on its back, the SCA uses twice as much!"

Image credit: NASA

Read the blog:
blogs.nasa.gov/cm/blog/shuttleferry

1 Comment »

Inside the NASA Crawler Transporter – PART 1 of 3

This is a guided tour I was given by KSC’s Crawler Transporter manager, back in 2000. We go throughout the interior and up on the top where the Mobile Launch platform for Apollo Saturn V and later the Space Shuttle stacks are mounted and taken out to the launch pad. You can learn more about these amazing machines at: www.nasa.gov With special thanks for the kind assistance of Kennedy Space Center PAO
Video Rating: 5 / 5

No Comments »

Inside the NASA Crawler Transporter – PART 2 of 3

Inside the NASA Crawler Transporter - PART 2 of 3

This is a guided tour I was given by KSC’s Crawler Transporter manager, back in 2000. We go throughout the interior and up on the top where the Mobile Launch platform for Apollo Saturn V and later the Space Shuttle stacks are mounted and taken out to the launch pad. You can learn more about these amazing machines at: www.nasa.gov With special thanks for the kind assistance of Kennedy Space Center PAO
Video Rating: 5 / 5

No Comments »

Inside the NASA Crawler Transporter – PART 3 of 3

Inside the NASA Crawler Transporter - PART 3 of 3

This is a guided tour I was given by KSC’s Crawler Transporter manager, back in 2000. We go throughout the interior and up on the top where the Mobile Launch platform for Apollo Saturn V and later the Space Shuttle stacks are mounted and taken out to the launch pad. You can learn more about these amazing machines at: www.nasa.gov With special thanks for the kind assistance of Kennedy Space Center PAO

No Comments »

WP Login